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chronic pain Tag

Got jaw pain? How about clicking or popping when you eat, yawn or talk? Jaw pain can stem from the Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) and may be a source of pain, clicking, popping, clenching, grinding, or changes in your bite. TMJ dysfunction can even cause pain to spread to the ear, neck and head. While direct injuries to the TMJ can cause pain in the jaw, such as those from playing sports or accidents, there are other causes that you may not have considered. The pelvis plays a role because the whole spine, including the head (and ultimately the jaw,) are stacked on top of it. Therefore, a twist or shift at the pelvis can cause a shift all the way up. Extensive dental work, whiplash car accidents, surgery, birth trauma, and even suppressed emotions can also lend themselves to pain and dysfunction

Are you suffering from lower back, SI joint, hip, pelvic, or groin pain? The pelvis may be to blame if it’s not moving adequately all the way around. Your pelvis is made up of three bones fused together: the ilium, ischium, and pubis. It sandwiches your tailbone (sacrum) in the back and meets in the front at the pubic bone. It is common to feel pain in your lower back, sacroiliac joint, or even your hips or groin after pregnancy, childbirth, falls, injuries, car accidents, sports injuries, or postural changes.   Just because this type of pain is common - doesn’t mean you have to suffer through it! Justine Calderwood, holistic physical therapist, discusses pelvic mobility in relation to common areas of pain in the low back and sacrum. This information is for you. Whether you’re a woman or a man- If you’ve had

Want to know my secret to easing chronic pain?   It’s this: a simple, 4” inflatable ball. It is the tool I recommend most often to release those tight, tense areas of the body. The real secret isn’t the ball itself, though. It’s what you DO when you’re using the ball that makes all the difference in the world.   As a holistic physical therapist, I give a small inflatable ball to every one of my patients day one when I see them. We’ve just finished with a through assessment of the strain patterns in their body and gentle hands-on Myofascial Release to address the tight, painful and tense areas. All this is accompanied by educating my new patient on what I see and feel in their body and why I’m doing what I’m doing.   While the ball is a tool to take care