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1. Check in with your breath. There are three primary ways to breathe: 1) with your diaphragm 2) with your belly 3) with the accessory muscles of your neck and shoulders. The most natural and relaxing way to breathe is Diaphragmatic Breathing, but most of us are using the other two, less effective, ways for oxygen exchange. When you breathe with your diaphragm, the intercostal muscles between the ribs do their proper job of helping the ribcage expand. As you inhale, the respiratory and pelvic diaphragms should move downward, like a piston, and with each exhale draw upward. This way of breathing fills your lungs and keeps the nervous system calm and happy. Unless you had a traumatic birth, you were likely born breathing with your diaphragm.  Breathing patterns can be changed over time through the following: During pregnancy, the liver, stomach, and

Previously, I have shared my journey towards identifying birth trauma and the start of healing. If you missed it, check out my blog post here. Today, I will summarize what classifies as birth flow disruptions and signs of lingering birth trauma.   Disruptions in the Birth Flow can happen with any of these scenarios: Cesarean Birth Birth where mom wasn’t able to do what she wanted Epidural or Medications Medical interventions such as Vacuum or Forceps Delivery Transfer to Hospital Internal Checks Medical Issues with Baby and/or Mom Right After Birth Incidents where Baby and Mom are Separated Telltale Signs of Lingering Birth Trauma: Body or Pelvic Disconnect Altered Body or Pelvic Sensations Not Taking Care of Yourself Avoiding Sexual Intimacy Anxiety Attacks Poor Eye Contact Inattentive to Baby Depressed or Major Mood Swings Distracted or Spacey Not Feeling in the Present Moment

Let’s talk about Birth Trauma. I think this discussion is really important. There are a lot of women walking around with the effects of birth trauma that don’t even know it. I’ll bet they’re just barely getting by because of what trauma does to your body, your mind, and your spirit. I was one of those women. Barely getting by and trying my hardest to keep it together.  I’m lucky I kept searching until I found the answers and the help that I needed. It wasn’t until I was doing my course work to become a Certified Birth Healing Specialist with the Institute for Birth Healing under the instruction of Lynn Schulte, PT, that I came to the FULL realization that I had suffered trauma when giving birth to my second daughter.   That was 10 years ago. I know. It seems a

I was talking with a healer friend of mine this morning about all juicy things related to healing, which means inevitably we talked about our own stuff. If you aren’t aware, a healer doesn’t actually heal you; they are simply someone to guide you so that you can heal yourself. In my experience that can only happen if the “healer” has done their own work. The inner journey isn’t the most important journey

Love yourself enough to self-treat everyday. As a physical therapist trained in the John F Barnes Myofascial Release Approach, I encourage my patients to self-treat everyday. What do I mean by self-treat? I mean taking the time out of everyday to take care of you. We’ve all heard “you can’t pour from an empty cup”. I get that you’re a busy mom and your co-workers are relying on you to get shit done day in and day out. You’re running your kids from here to there after school and there’s yet another dinner eaten in the car or while sitting on the bleachers during practice or games. You pack lunches and snacks and sign papers and manage to see that your kids get their homework done. You volunteer like you’re expected to. I also get that you’re a busy dad. You bring