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pelvis Tag

So, you’re pregnant and you’re wondering if physical therapy is safe during pregnancy? The simple answer - yes! I know you’re probably thinking physical therapy is only for people that have sport or accident-related injuries. That is totally not true. Physical therapy can really be for anyone who’s just trying to figure out and learn how their body moves and functions. So, preparing for one of the biggest physical tolls that can be done to a woman’s body (aka birth) is a great opportunity to prep, stretch, and strengthen all the muscles that will be involved in the birthing process. But how exactly can physical therapy help you while you're pregnant? https://youtu.be/2IL4LHvgTDY 1. It can help with pregnancy-related pain You got it. We’re talking low back pain, SI joint pain, pelvic pain, and any symphysis pubic dysfunction. This also includes neck and head pain like migraines

Labor can be - let’s face it - scary. Whether it’s your first child or your fifth, the time leading up to your delivery can be nerve racking. There are many things you can do to at least ease these nerves. Being prepared is the best thing you can do and there are many ways to prepare for a smoother birth. Read 8 of my top labor tips below.   1. Explore different birth positions Don’t be afraid to try these out! Find out what works the best for your body because every body is different. Some different positions are: squatting being up on all fours sidelying being on your back Keeping the pelvis open may work in your best favor as it’s easier for the baby to come out. Squatting and being on all fours open the pelvis up just a little bit

Do you have a constant feeling that some of your abdominal organs might fall out? Don’t worry - you’re not crazy. You may be suffering from pelvic organ prolapse. Pelvic organ prolapse is when the organs inside of your pelvic cavity descend into the vaginal vault and may even extend to the outside of your body. These organs may be your bladder, urethra, uterus, or rectum. This may sound like something from a zombie movie but one in five women in the United States are actually suffering from pelvic organ prolapse. What is the cause of pelvic organ prolapse? There are many causes for pelvic organ prolapse. The number one cause is pregnancy (labor and delivery, included). It can also be sparked by obesity, respiratory conditions (due to chronic coughing), pelvic cancers, or hysterectomies. Another cause can be chronic constipation due

Pregnancy can be painful - duh! No one needed to tell you that. Not only are you prepping for your new little one, but you have pregnancy pain to deal with. There are some pains that come with pregnancy that can be annoying. For example, those migraines that won’t go away or that heartburn - let’s not even talk about it! Other pains are located in your lower back, SI joint, tailbone, and/or pubic symphysis. Not to mention the overlying anxiety about delivery itself. Well, some of these pains can be subdued or even avoided altogether! 1. Pay attention to your day-to-day body movements Bend at the waist, avoid twisting, and evenly distribute your weight. How you move your body throughout the day should be something you pay close attention to. Picking up miscellaneous items around the house? Make sure you are using

1. Check in with your breath. There are three primary ways to breathe: 1) with your diaphragm 2) with your belly 3) with the accessory muscles of your neck and shoulders. The most natural and relaxing way to breathe is Diaphragmatic Breathing, but most of us are using the other two, less effective, ways for oxygen exchange. When you breathe with your diaphragm, the intercostal muscles between the ribs do their proper job of helping the ribcage expand. As you inhale, the respiratory and pelvic diaphragms should move downward, like a piston, and with each exhale draw upward. This way of breathing fills your lungs and keeps the nervous system calm and happy. Unless you had a traumatic birth, you were likely born breathing with your diaphragm.  Breathing patterns can be changed over time through the following: During pregnancy, the liver, stomach, and

Are you suffering from lower back, SI joint, hip, pelvic, or groin pain? The pelvis may be to blame if it’s not moving adequately all the way around. Your pelvis is made up of three bones fused together: the ilium, ischium, and pubis. It sandwiches your tailbone (sacrum) in the back and meets in the front at the pubic bone. It is common to feel pain in your lower back, sacroiliac joint, or even your hips or groin after pregnancy, childbirth, falls, injuries, car accidents, sports injuries, or postural changes.   Just because this type of pain is common - doesn’t mean you have to suffer through it! Justine Calderwood, holistic physical therapist, discusses pelvic mobility in relation to common areas of pain in the low back and sacrum. This information is for you. Whether you’re a woman or a man- If you’ve had

Want to know my secret to easing chronic pain?   It’s this: a simple, 4” inflatable ball. It is the tool I recommend most often to release those tight, tense areas of the body. The real secret isn’t the ball itself, though. It’s what you DO when you’re using the ball that makes all the difference in the world.   As a holistic physical therapist, I give a small inflatable ball to every one of my patients day one when I see them. We’ve just finished with a through assessment of the strain patterns in their body and gentle hands-on Myofascial Release to address the tight, painful and tense areas. All this is accompanied by educating my new patient on what I see and feel in their body and why I’m doing what I’m doing.   While the ball is a tool to take care

  It’s that time of year when you may be gearing up to spend the holidays with family and friends. But what do you do if you’re in pain, either from a chronic condition or recently injured, and you need to travel?   Two things come to mind when I think about traveling for the holidays. One is getting to and from your destination, which may involve a long car drive, airplane travel or other public transportation. The other thing is what to consider when you arrive, since you may be staying with family, friends, or even in a hotel or rental home.   At the holidays, we pack up our car to head back to the Midwest to visit family. It’s a 15 hour drive to Iowa from our home in Colorado, and we usually make the trek in one day. I have