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self-care Tag

Labor can be - let’s face it - scary. Whether it’s your first child or your fifth, the time leading up to your delivery can be nerve racking. There are many things you can do to at least ease these nerves. Being prepared is the best thing you can do and there are many ways to prepare for a smoother birth. Read 8 of my top labor tips below.   1. Explore different birth positions Don’t be afraid to try these out! Find out what works the best for your body because every body is different. Some different positions are: squatting being up on all fours sidelying being on your back Keeping the pelvis open may work in your best favor as it’s easier for the baby to come out. Squatting and being on all fours open the pelvis up just a little bit

Do you have a constant feeling that some of your abdominal organs might fall out? Don’t worry - you’re not crazy. You may be suffering from pelvic organ prolapse. Pelvic organ prolapse is when the organs inside of your pelvic cavity descend into the vaginal vault and may even extend to the outside of your body. These organs may be your bladder, urethra, uterus, or rectum. This may sound like something from a zombie movie but one in five women in the United States are actually suffering from pelvic organ prolapse. What is the cause of pelvic organ prolapse? There are many causes for pelvic organ prolapse. The number one cause is pregnancy (labor and delivery, included). It can also be sparked by obesity, respiratory conditions (due to chronic coughing), pelvic cancers, or hysterectomies. Another cause can be chronic constipation due

Pregnancy can be painful - duh! No one needed to tell you that. Not only are you prepping for your new little one, but you have pregnancy pain to deal with. There are some pains that come with pregnancy that can be annoying. For example, those migraines that won’t go away or that heartburn - let’s not even talk about it! Other pains are located in your lower back, SI joint, tailbone, and/or pubic symphysis. Not to mention the overlying anxiety about delivery itself. Well, some of these pains can be subdued or even avoided altogether! 1. Pay attention to your day-to-day body movements Bend at the waist, avoid twisting, and evenly distribute your weight. How you move your body throughout the day should be something you pay close attention to. Picking up miscellaneous items around the house? Make sure you are using

1. Check in with your breath. There are three primary ways to breathe: 1) with your diaphragm 2) with your belly 3) with the accessory muscles of your neck and shoulders. The most natural and relaxing way to breathe is Diaphragmatic Breathing, but most of us are using the other two, less effective, ways for oxygen exchange. When you breathe with your diaphragm, the intercostal muscles between the ribs do their proper job of helping the ribcage expand. As you inhale, the respiratory and pelvic diaphragms should move downward, like a piston, and with each exhale draw upward. This way of breathing fills your lungs and keeps the nervous system calm and happy. Unless you had a traumatic birth, you were likely born breathing with your diaphragm.  Breathing patterns can be changed over time through the following: During pregnancy, the liver, stomach, and

Got jaw pain? How about clicking or popping when you eat, yawn or talk? Jaw pain can stem from the Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) and may be a source of pain, clicking, popping, clenching, grinding, or changes in your bite. TMJ dysfunction can even cause pain to spread to the ear, neck and head. While direct injuries to the TMJ can cause pain in the jaw, such as those from playing sports or accidents, there are other causes that you may not have considered. The pelvis plays a role because the whole spine, including the head (and ultimately the jaw,) are stacked on top of it. Therefore, a twist or shift at the pelvis can cause a shift all the way up. Extensive dental work, whiplash car accidents, surgery, birth trauma, and even suppressed emotions can also lend themselves to pain and dysfunction

Previously, I have shared my journey towards identifying birth trauma and the start of healing. If you missed it, check out my blog post here. Today, I will summarize what classifies as birth flow disruptions and signs of lingering birth trauma.   Disruptions in the Birth Flow can happen with any of these scenarios: Cesarean Birth Birth where mom wasn’t able to do what she wanted Epidural or Medications Medical interventions such as Vacuum or Forceps Delivery Transfer to Hospital Internal Checks Medical Issues with Baby and/or Mom Right After Birth Incidents where Baby and Mom are Separated Telltale Signs of Lingering Birth Trauma: Body or Pelvic Disconnect Altered Body or Pelvic Sensations Not Taking Care of Yourself Avoiding Sexual Intimacy Anxiety Attacks Poor Eye Contact Inattentive to Baby Depressed or Major Mood Swings Distracted or Spacey Not Feeling in the Present Moment

Let’s talk about Birth Trauma. I think this discussion is really important. There are a lot of women walking around with the effects of birth trauma that don’t even know it. I’ll bet they’re just barely getting by because of what trauma does to your body, your mind, and your spirit. I was one of those women. Barely getting by and trying my hardest to keep it together.  I’m lucky I kept searching until I found the answers and the help that I needed. It wasn’t until I was doing my course work to become a Certified Birth Healing Specialist with the Institute for Birth Healing under the instruction of Lynn Schulte, PT, that I came to the FULL realization that I had suffered trauma when giving birth to my second daughter.   That was 10 years ago. I know. It seems a

  It’s that time of year when you may be gearing up to spend the holidays with family and friends. But what do you do if you’re in pain, either from a chronic condition or recently injured, and you need to travel?   Two things come to mind when I think about traveling for the holidays. One is getting to and from your destination, which may involve a long car drive, airplane travel or other public transportation. The other thing is what to consider when you arrive, since you may be staying with family, friends, or even in a hotel or rental home.   At the holidays, we pack up our car to head back to the Midwest to visit family. It’s a 15 hour drive to Iowa from our home in Colorado, and we usually make the trek in one day. I have